Thursday, December 17, 2009

Cliffhangers


I just finished reading Stieg Larsson's The Girl who Played with Fire. This is the second book in the series and features the character of Lisbeth Salander. I talked about the first novel, The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo, here.

When I got to the end of The Girl who Played with Fire last night, I literally yelled. My daughter rushed into the room and said, "What? What's wrong?"

"This book!" I said. "It just...ended! Just like that!"

"How did it end?"

"The guy dials 911 and then...nothing!"

She gave me a strange look and then went back to her bedroom, probably wondering what in the heck was wrong with her mother.

Larsson uses a true cliffhanger for The Girl who Played with Fire. I won't put any spoilers here, but suffice to say, you read the last page and immediately want to start the next book. Only the next book hasn't been released yet in the U.S.

I have to wait until May 2010 to find out what happens.

I'm thinking I will order the third one from the U.K.!!!

What do you think about cliffhanger endings? Like 'em? Hate 'em?


12 comments:

  1. I think it goes both ways. I hate that I have to be patient, but then I love that there's something to look forward to.

    I'd have screamed, too!

    ReplyDelete
  2. It was the strangest thing. I had no clue I was reading the last page (I never look ahead when I read) so when I turned the page and I realized it was the end, I was literally in shock.

    ReplyDelete
  3. I do like a shock ending. Have you ever read Atonement by Ian McEwan? His book ends with two different endings and its up to the reader to chose which one they prefer.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Abi - I haven't read Atonement, though I started reading it. I watched the movie, though, and *hated* the ending!

    ReplyDelete
  5. I love writing cliffhanger endings. I like reading them and yet I hate reading them too. It's the impatience in me, I think.

    ReplyDelete
  6. I like 'em even when there's no sequel...if I have enough information to make up my mind about what happens next. I don't like them in movies but in books it's OK with me. I also like endings that elude to the future. As for endings with all bits tied up neatly with a bow? I like those least of all.

    ReplyDelete
  7. YOu may be able to save money on shipping by pulling it through Amazon Canada. That's what I do when I want UK releases -- they're usually available in Canada, and the shipping from Canada is cheaper.

    Or try the Wordl's Biggest Bookstore (used to be called Cole's) in Toronto.

    ReplyDelete
  8. Oh, you poor thing! There's nothing worse than needing to read on, only the book isn't written! Yikes!

    Sending you some patience...

    ReplyDelete
  9. I hate it. I want my book to have a beginning, middle and end. A cliffhanger like that just seems like a way to manipulate you into buying the next book. Like - we're not going to tell you how it ends, even though you paid for this book, until you spend MORE money on the next book. I would likely not buy the next book then just on principle alone.

    ReplyDelete
  10. There are several books I've followed through the years. Currently reading Diana Gabaldon's 6th. I used to go back and reread each of them before but had not time for that this year. A tad lost.

    But I hadn't planned on reading the second of this trilogy. Found the first one in dire need of an editor. (Perhaps true for the later of the above mentioned as well.)

    Enjoyed your perspective however. I have been known to try, try again.

    ReplyDelete
  11. Oh no I'd hate that, especially if I couldn't then immediately start the next book. So frustrating.

    ReplyDelete
  12. I agree with Kelly. While I don't like endings that are tied up in neat bows--a little ambiguity is nice--I want a sense of closure, a feeling that the book has truly come to an end.

    Otherwise, it feels manipulative. In your shoes, I'd have yelled, too.

    ReplyDelete

I love to hear from you!

It's Time

I've had this blog for over 10 years. But I'm finding that I go to it less and less. Maybe it's the death of blogging that broug...